Connect with us

iPhone

iPhone SE Review

Published

on

If we’re talking about the iPhone SE, then we need to get one thing straight first. It looks EXACTLY like an iPhone 5s, and if you see one on the street, there is practically no way that you could tell it’s the new four inch phone, besides the addition of two letters on the back.  But looks aside, almost everything else that you can’t see has changed, and these things make the iPhone SE worth talking about.

If you’re currently an iPhone 6 or 6s user, than using an iPhone SE is strange. It feels like a step back because your muscle memory gets really used to (and loves) a bigger screen with more space.  Or if you’ve been using a 4 inch device like the iPhone 5 for a while, the iPhone SE feels no different.[adinserter name=”Responsive”]

It’s 1136 by 640 display looks as crisp as ever, with the same 326 pixels per inch that we’ve seen on 4 to 4.7 inch iPhones for the lat couple of generations. It’s not the Retina HD display, just the standard version, but it’s still a nice screen and I don’t have any problem with it. Even if it is almost four years old.

You know how they say, “out with old, and in with the new?”  Well, this was Apple’s motto for the rest of the iPhone SE.

The rear camera mirrors the iPhone 6s, which means, for those of you playing along at home, is capable of capturing 12 megapixel still images and recording video in 4K.  It’s an iPhone and it looks great.  I don’t think you’ll have any complaints (although the camera on the new Samsung Galaxy S7 is impressive).  Plus, Live Photos seem to be the gold standard for Apple as of late, because you can shoot those on the iPhone SE, too.[adinserter name=”Responsive”]

So the back camera is great, but front camera is disappointing.  Unlike the 5 megapixel counterpart on the iPhone 6s, the iPhone SE is still, “rocking,” a 1.2 megapixel shooter.  It’s weird, right?  This phone matches the iPhone 6s in almost every other aspect but it’s like someone just forgot to upgrade the camera the most of us will be using to take non-stop selfies.  Or maybe that’s just me.

Inside, the iPhone SE houses a speedy A9 chip, with an emphasis on the word speedy.  I have yet to experience a slow down or lag of any kind.  With iOS 9.3 on board by default alongside one of the fastest mobile processors ever, the iPhone SE feels like a flagship phone.  And we’ve got the M9 coprocessor as an added bonus.[adinserter name=”Responsive”]

The specs are nice.  But what’s even nicer is the battery life.  I glanced at the spec sheet on apple.com and saw that the battery life looked to be above average, and better than the projected battery life on an iPhone 6 or 6s.  It has only surpassed my expectations.  My iPhone 6s, at least lately, has needed a charge every single day before bed.  Which isn’t fun.  From my experience with the iPhone SE, charging before bed just isn’t a worry with moderate use throughout the day.

I mentioned earlier that the iPhone SE felt like a flagship device.  But this iPhone is not (well at least to our knowledge) the new iPhone for 2016.  I mean it is a new iPhone but it’s not, the new iPhone for this year.  Because that’ll probably launch in September by the name of iPhone 7.  You see, almost everything about iPhone SE makes it feel like the front runner for Apple this year.  But it’s not and that’s partly what makes this device so interesting.  It’s a flash from the past that’s also the latest and greatest.[adinserter name=”Responsive”]

Sure, this device has its quirks—the 1.2 megapixel FaceTime camera, first generation Touch ID, no barometer—but all of that really doesn’t matter for this iPhone.  Because it’s not the flagship, and it’s not priced like one either.  At $399 dollars this iPhone is the cheapest iPhone ever.  Usually when we think about a cheap iPhone, we think of an older model with outdated specs.  But that’s not the case this time.  Because the iPhone SE isn’t just the cheapest iPhone ever, it’s one of the best phones I’ve ever used, and is going to remain in my pocket for a while.  Or at least until September.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Advertisement